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Frequently Asked Questions & Answers
About Traditional Recurves, Longbows, and I.L.F. Take Down Bows
Here are some frequently asked questions regarding Traditional Recurves, Longbows, and I.L.F. Take Down Bows.  Whether you are a long-time archer or relatively new to the sport, we hope this information will give you some new insight into Traditional Archery equipment and I.L.F. interchangeable take down bows.

Q.

What does I.L.F. stand for?

A.
It stands for International Limb Fixture.  It is an interchangeable system of riser and limb parts developed by Earl Hoyt Jr. and is used around the world.
 

 

Q.
Can I use my I.L.F. Limbs on any I.L.F. Riser and visa-versa?
A.
Yes, I.L.F. Limbs are interchangeable with any Riser designed to accept I.L.F. Limbs made by any manufacture and any I.L.F. Riser will accept any manufacturer's I.L.F. Limbs.
 

 

Q.
How do you calculate bow length?
A.

The length of the bow is determined by adding the distance between the riser bolts to the length of both limbs.

  1. Bolt Pattern is the length between Limb Bolts.
  2. The Bolt Pattern is 5" shorter than the Riser.
  3. I.L.F. Limb lengths are: Short 23", Medium 24", and Long 25".
  4. Example: 15" Riser + Long Limbs = 60" Bow
  5. 10" Bolt Pattern + (2 X 25" Limbs) = 60" Bow
 

 

Q.
How do you measure the brace height?
A.

Measure Brace Height (Fistmele) from the pivot point, or the most inward point of the grip, to the bowstring.

Suggested Brace Height --
Recurve Brace Height: 7 1/4" to 8 1/2"
Longbow Brace Height: 7" to 8"

 
Q.
When measuring the weight of I.L.F. Limbs, how tight should the limbs be to the riser?
A.
Hunting/Field Bows: Weight of limbs is measured with limbs tightened down to riser then backed off 1/4 turn.
 

 

Q.
How tight should the bolts be tightened to the riser?
A.
Limb bolts should be tightened down to the riser then backed off 1/4 turn.  Turning back limb bolts 1/4 turn enables you to assemble limbs to riser without tools.
 

 

Q.
How much weight do my limbs gain on a shorter riser?
A.

I.L.F. Limbs gain or go up in weight approximately 1 pound per inch, going down in riser length.

For example, 25" riser with limbs = 38#, putting the same limbs on a 15" riser = 48#.

 

 

Q.
How much can the weight be adjusted?
A.

Poundage can be adjusted by approximately 10% of the bow weight by loosening the limb bolts.  Each turn of the limb bolts will reduce the weight by approximately 2% of the bow weight.

For example -- a 50# bow can be reduced by 1 pound with one turn of the limb bolts and reduced by 5 pounds with 5 turns of the bolts.  On a 35# bow you can reduce the poundage approximately 3.5# with 5 turns of the bolts.

The maximum you can turn the limb bolts out is 5 turns.

Anything greater would be a safety hazard.

 

 

Q.
Can you adjust tiller?
A.

The I.L.F. system allows you to change tiller by backing out or screwing in the limb bolts.

For example -- If you shoot 3 fingers under, you would want equal tiller of the limbs.  If you shoot split finger, you would want approximately 3/16" less tiller on the bottom limb.

 

 

Q.
Do all risers have the same angle for the limbs at the plates?
A.
The limb angles are different on each riser made by each bowyer.  The shorter the riser the more deflex. This prevents over stressing the limbs at the bowyer's draw recommendations.
 

 

Q.
What does the "dovetail" do?
A.
The dovetail controls the limb alignment.  Limb alignment is accomplished by adjusting the dovetail set screws on the side of the limb pocket.  The "detent bushing" assembly in the bottom of the limb aids in holding the limb in place prior to being strung.  The screw on the back of the assembly is to hold pressure on the detent spring and does not adjust anything.
 

 

Q.
What is the sleeve on the limb bolt for?
A.
The sleeve on the limb bolt provides a tight fit between the 5/16 limb bolt and the 3/8 slot in the limb.  This ensures the limbs to start off straight.  It also stops the threads from contacting the limb.
 

 

Q.
Why do you need linear adjustment?
A.
Today's modern risers are cut with a CNC Machine and do not really need linear adjustment.  The linear adjustments were originally included to compensate for the tolerances of a multi-stage set up (i.e. riser and two limbs), when older model risers greater than 23" were not straight.  The linear adjustment was not intended to compensate for crooked limbs, but rather crooked risers.
 

 

Q.
What is the best way to string an I.L.F. Riser and Limbs?
A.

We strongly recommend that you use a bow stringer to string your recurve or longbow.  Stringing a bow can be a difficult operation and you can damage your bow without one.

  1. Take the bow stringer, it has a saddle at one end and a cup at the other.
  2. Slide the saddle over the top limb and place the smaller cup over the bottom limb tip.
  3. Take the handle of the bow and block the stringer with both you feet.
  4. Pull the handle vertically to bend the bow while supporting the saddle.
  5. When the limbs are sufficiently bent, the bow stringer should remain in place and allow you to slowly slide the string up to the notch on the tip of the limb.
  6. Release slowly and remove the bow stringer.  Make sure the string is correctly positioned.
  7. The bow is now strung and ready to shoot.
  8. Archery Questions and Answeres
 

 

Q.
What is the warranty on SKY Archery Bows?
A.
Each bow is backed by the SKY Archery Limited Warranty to the original owner only.  All metal components, limb, polymer, and wood parts, grips or other bow components (excluding string) have a 2 year warranty against manufactured defects to the original owner only.
 

Hand Made in the USA | Contact us for more info


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